On dual narratives

25 Aug

by Ilan Bloch

Image courtesy of Wikimedia

Image courtesy of Wikimedia

I have been involved in Israel programs for more than a decade here, and also for many years in Australia, where I was raised. I see this as such an important enterprise because it offers participants the opportunity to undergo a transformative experience, whether in the realm of spiritual-, national- or self-identity development. Spending time in Israel is truly life-changing. Facilitating such an experience can also change the tour guide himself. I certainly feel tremendously affected by my experiences dual-narrative guiding — both from my interactions with Palestinian tour guide colleagues, as well as with Palestinian guest speakers.

I am against Prime Minister Netanyahu’s demand that the Palestinians recognize Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people, especially as a precondition for negotiations. This is because I cannot fathom a world where PA rais Mahmoud Abbas will give Israel a kosher certificate for policies which privilege Jewish Israeli citizens over Palestinian Israeli citizens. Moreover, Israel does not need Palestinian approval to define itself one way or another. To suggest as much represents galuti (Exilic) Jewish servility – something which Zionism and the establishment of the State were, amongst other things, meant to redress. And, of course, to make such a demand a precondition for the resumption of negotiations appeared to be a delaying tactic.

But, after recent experiences dual-narrative guiding, together with Palestinian tour guide colleagues, I have changed. I have seen significant disagreements develop between myself, a moderate Israeli Jew, and moderate Palestinian tour guides, as well as Palestinian guest speakers. I see that some Israeli Jews can and do accept Palestinian narratives as legitimate and valid (whether we agree with them or not) but that many Palestinians refuse to accept the fundamental basis of the Israeli narrative as legitimate and valid. They seem to only truly accept Israelis who disavow Zionism. I refuse to disavow Zionism just as I would never demand that Palestinians disavow their most basic truths.

I do not need Palestinians to become Zionists, nor even to accept that the State of Israel should have been established. However, I do need them to appreciate the religious and national ongoing connection of the Jewish people to the Land of Israel. My existence here in Jerusalem is qualitatively different to the existence of the French in Algeria. My roots here are deep and historic. This land is the cradle of Jewish civilization. I do not need Palestinians to agree with my claims (just as I do not believe that the Palestinians are descendants of the Jebusites – a major claim about Palestinian pedigree which I have heard uttered again and again as a basic truth) but I need them to understand that in the Jewish national consciousness I am not a European colonialist usurper who is a stranger to this land. Without this understanding, peace will not arrive.

We do not need to accept the other’s narrative as true but we need to understand it and accept that the other certainly believes it to be true. From there, with competing and clashing narratives, understood and accepted by both sides, we can have the strength to move forward to a better future, in which both peoples can enjoy peace, security and human rights.

Ilan Bloch is a licensed Israel tour guide and the Director of Teaching Israel.

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